Fifteen New Young Adult Missionaries to Serve in United States - See more at: http://www.umcmission.org/learn-about-us/news-and-stories/2015/july/fifteen-new-young-adult-missionaries-to-serve-in-united-states#sthash.ar9EAOVC.dpuf

Fifteen New Young Adult Missionaries to Serve in United States - See more at: http://www.umcmission.org/learn-about-us/news-and-stories/2015/july/fifteen-new-young-adult-missionaries-to-serve-in-united-states#sthash.ar9EAOVC.dpuf

By Elliott Wright

New York, New York, July 30, 2015—Enthusiasm and challenge marked the reception today of 15 new United Methodist young adult missionaries for service in the United States. The new Global Mission Fellows will work for two years in ministries that link faith and justice issues. 

The young men and women were commissioned, that is, appointed by the church, in a joy-filled service of worship at the chapel of The Interchurch Center, the current headquarters of the denomination’s mission agency, the General Board of Global Ministries. Drum and saxophone accompanied the soon-to-be missionaries as they entered the chapel in a syncopated line, pausing in course to hear scripture readings that set the worship themes of water and the tree of life.

They were charged and challenged to see themselves as equipped by God for their work. “You have all you need,” was the watchword of the sermon by Bishop Jane Middleton, resident interim episcopal leader of the New York Annual (regional) Conference, who presided at the commissioning. 

The 15 include persons from 11 annual conferences, who are assigned to work sites in eight conferences. Global Mission Fellows are 20 to 30 years old, and typically are single, recent college graduates. The 2015 class has the distinction of including three couples: Kimberly and Gregory Bishop from Virginia, Caitlin and Andrew Kastner from Missouri, and Victoria and Nicholas Stanford from Michigan.

The Bishops are assigned to the Nome Community Center in Alaska, and the Kastners and Stanfords will work in Miami and Jacksonville in projects related to the Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference. Other work locations include Philadelphia, Detroit, rural Virginia, Tucson, Arizona, Oklahoma City, and Washington, D.C. [see list below]. 

Global Mission Fellows is a two-year old program that builds on decades’ old precedents. It operates in U.S. and international components. Those who serve in the U.S. are called US 2s, and are placed through affiliates—regional church units, institutions, or organizations—that take primary responsibility for specific work, which can vary over the course of two years.

To date, more than 150 Global Mission Fellows have answered “yes” when asked, in this case by Bishop Middleton, if they believed they were led by the Holy Spirit to mission service. They further promise to do their work “in love and humility, with integrity and sincerity.” More than 50 others are expected to be commissioned for international assignments in late August.

As they approached the chancel, the young people removed their shoes, named something they were leaving behind in becoming missionaries, and then poured a pitcher of water into a common basin—symbolic of leaving behind one life and joining—through the water—the missionary community of faith and service. Things being left included “fear and doubt,” “the feeling of inadequacy,” “easy choices,” and “the comforts of home.”

Bishop Middleton’s sermon, based on verses in Luke 9 in which Jesus sends out disciples as missionaries without baggage, told the missionaries they were chosen, empowered, and blessed by God for whatever lies before them. She asked them to repeatedly say to themselves, “God is with me!” Their message in all they do, the bishop said, is the message of God’s love. “There is no limit to the love of God manifest in Jesus Christ,” she declared. 

After being commissioned to “take the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ into all the world,” the missionaries offered in unison the historic covenant prayer that begins, addressed to God, “I am no longer my own, but thine.” Each received an anchor cross, the traditional sign of United Methodist missionary service.

The Global Mission Fellows program in all its facets takes young adults such as these out of their home environments and places them in new contexts, where they become part of new local communities. One objective is to connect the church in mission across cultural and geographical boundaries. Another is to encourage the young people to grow spiritually and socially, becoming strong leaders committed to building justice communities and a peaceful world. 

The new US 2 Global Mission Fellows are, alphabetically, by home annual conference and placement:

• Kimberly Bishop, Virginia, to: Nome Community Center, Alaska

 

Gregory Bishop, Virginia, to Nome Community Center, Alaska

 

Jamie Booth, Kentucky, to St. Francis in the Foothills UMC, Tucson, Arizona

 

Amber Feezor, Arkansas, to General Board of Church & Society, Washington, DC

 

Kayla Flannery, Desert Southwest, to Detroit Annual Conference

 

Sarah Hundley, Virginia, to Oklahoma Annual Conference

Andrew Kastner, Missouri, to Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference

Caitlin Kastner, Missouri, to Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference

Emily Kvalheim, West Ohio, to Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference

Catherine Shaw, East Ohio, to Francis in the Foothills UMC, Tucson, Arizona

Nicholas Stanford, West Michigan, Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference

Victoria Stanford, West Michigan, to Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference

Rachel Ternes, Rocky Mountain, to Central District Eastern Pennsylvania Annual Conference

 

Christina Trager, Peninsula-Delaware, to Virginia Annual Conference

 

Chelsea Williams, North Carolina, to Detroit Annual Conference.

 

Elliott Wright is an information consultant working with the General Board of Global Ministries.

- See more at: http://www.umcmission.org/learn-about-us/news-and-stories/2015/july/fifteen-new-young-adult-missionaries-to-serve-in-united-states#sthash.ar9EAOVC.dpuf
By Elliott Wright

New York, New York, July 30, 2015—Enthusiasm and challenge marked the reception today of 15 new United Methodist young adult missionaries for service in the United States. The new Global Mission Fellows will work for two years in ministries that link faith and justice issues. 

The young men and women were commissioned, that is, appointed by the church, in a joy-filled service of worship at the chapel of The Interchurch Center, the current headquarters of the denomination’s mission agency, the General Board of Global Ministries. Drum and saxophone accompanied the soon-to-be missionaries as they entered the chapel in a syncopated line, pausing in course to hear scripture readings that set the worship themes of water and the tree of life.

They were charged and challenged to see themselves as equipped by God for their work. “You have all you need,” was the watchword of the sermon by Bishop Jane Middleton, resident interim episcopal leader of the New York Annual (regional) Conference, who presided at the commissioning. 

The 15 include persons from 11 annual conferences, who are assigned to work sites in eight conferences. Global Mission Fellows are 20 to 30 years old, and typically are single, recent college graduates. The 2015 class has the distinction of including three couples: Kimberly and Gregory Bishop from Virginia, Caitlin and Andrew Kastner from Missouri, and Victoria and Nicholas Stanford from Michigan.

The Bishops are assigned to the Nome Community Center in Alaska, and the Kastners and Stanfords will work in Miami and Jacksonville in projects related to the Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference. Other work locations include Philadelphia, Detroit, rural Virginia, Tucson, Arizona, Oklahoma City, and Washington, D.C. [see list below]. 

Global Mission Fellows is a two-year old program that builds on decades’ old precedents. It operates in U.S. and international components. Those who serve in the U.S. are called US 2s, and are placed through affiliates—regional church units, institutions, or organizations—that take primary responsibility for specific work, which can vary over the course of two years.

To date, more than 150 Global Mission Fellows have answered “yes” when asked, in this case by Bishop Middleton, if they believed they were led by the Holy Spirit to mission service. They further promise to do their work “in love and humility, with integrity and sincerity.” More than 50 others are expected to be commissioned for international assignments in late August.

As they approached the chancel, the young people removed their shoes, named something they were leaving behind in becoming missionaries, and then poured a pitcher of water into a common basin—symbolic of leaving behind one life and joining—through the water—the missionary community of faith and service. Things being left included “fear and doubt,” “the feeling of inadequacy,” “easy choices,” and “the comforts of home.”

Bishop Middleton’s sermon, based on verses in Luke 9 in which Jesus sends out disciples as missionaries without baggage, told the missionaries they were chosen, empowered, and blessed by God for whatever lies before them. She asked them to repeatedly say to themselves, “God is with me!” Their message in all they do, the bishop said, is the message of God’s love. “There is no limit to the love of God manifest in Jesus Christ,” she declared. 

After being commissioned to “take the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ into all the world,” the missionaries offered in unison the historic covenant prayer that begins, addressed to God, “I am no longer my own, but thine.” Each received an anchor cross, the traditional sign of United Methodist missionary service.

The Global Mission Fellows program in all its facets takes young adults such as these out of their home environments and places them in new contexts, where they become part of new local communities. One objective is to connect the church in mission across cultural and geographical boundaries. Another is to encourage the young people to grow spiritually and socially, becoming strong leaders committed to building justice communities and a peaceful world. 

The new US 2 Global Mission Fellows are, alphabetically, by home annual conference and placement:

• Kimberly Bishop, Virginia, to: Nome Community Center, Alaska

 

Gregory Bishop, Virginia, to Nome Community Center, Alaska

 

Jamie Booth, Kentucky, to St. Francis in the Foothills UMC, Tucson, Arizona

 

Amber Feezor, Arkansas, to General Board of Church & Society, Washington, DC

 

Kayla Flannery, Desert Southwest, to Detroit Annual Conference

 

Sarah Hundley, Virginia, to Oklahoma Annual Conference

Andrew Kastner, Missouri, to Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference

Caitlin Kastner, Missouri, to Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference

Emily Kvalheim, West Ohio, to Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference

Catherine Shaw, East Ohio, to Francis in the Foothills UMC, Tucson, Arizona

Nicholas Stanford, West Michigan, Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference

Victoria Stanford, West Michigan, to Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference

Rachel Ternes, Rocky Mountain, to Central District Eastern Pennsylvania Annual Conference

 

Christina Trager, Peninsula-Delaware, to Virginia Annual Conference

 

Chelsea Williams, North Carolina, to Detroit Annual Conference.

 

Elliott Wright is an information consultant working with the General Board of Global Ministries.

- See more at: http://www.umcmission.org/learn-about-us/news-and-stories/2015/july/fifteen-new-young-adult-missionaries-to-serve-in-united-states#sthash.ar9EAOVC.dpuf
By Elliott Wright

New York, New York, July 30, 2015—Enthusiasm and challenge marked the reception today of 15 new United Methodist young adult missionaries for service in the United States. The new Global Mission Fellows will work for two years in ministries that link faith and justice issues. 

The young men and women were commissioned, that is, appointed by the church, in a joy-filled service of worship at the chapel of The Interchurch Center, the current headquarters of the denomination’s mission agency, the General Board of Global Ministries. Drum and saxophone accompanied the soon-to-be missionaries as they entered the chapel in a syncopated line, pausing in course to hear scripture readings that set the worship themes of water and the tree of life.

They were charged and challenged to see themselves as equipped by God for their work. “You have all you need,” was the watchword of the sermon by Bishop Jane Middleton, resident interim episcopal leader of the New York Annual (regional) Conference, who presided at the commissioning. 

The 15 include persons from 11 annual conferences, who are assigned to work sites in eight conferences. Global Mission Fellows are 20 to 30 years old, and typically are single, recent college graduates. The 2015 class has the distinction of including three couples: Kimberly and Gregory Bishop from Virginia, Caitlin and Andrew Kastner from Missouri, and Victoria and Nicholas Stanford from Michigan.

The Bishops are assigned to the Nome Community Center in Alaska, and the Kastners and Stanfords will work in Miami and Jacksonville in projects related to the Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference. Other work locations include Philadelphia, Detroit, rural Virginia, Tucson, Arizona, Oklahoma City, and Washington, D.C. [see list below]. 

Global Mission Fellows is a two-year old program that builds on decades’ old precedents. It operates in U.S. and international components. Those who serve in the U.S. are called US 2s, and are placed through affiliates—regional church units, institutions, or organizations—that take primary responsibility for specific work, which can vary over the course of two years.

To date, more than 150 Global Mission Fellows have answered “yes” when asked, in this case by Bishop Middleton, if they believed they were led by the Holy Spirit to mission service. They further promise to do their work “in love and humility, with integrity and sincerity.” More than 50 others are expected to be commissioned for international assignments in late August.

As they approached the chancel, the young people removed their shoes, named something they were leaving behind in becoming missionaries, and then poured a pitcher of water into a common basin—symbolic of leaving behind one life and joining—through the water—the missionary community of faith and service. Things being left included “fear and doubt,” “the feeling of inadequacy,” “easy choices,” and “the comforts of home.”

Bishop Middleton’s sermon, based on verses in Luke 9 in which Jesus sends out disciples as missionaries without baggage, told the missionaries they were chosen, empowered, and blessed by God for whatever lies before them. She asked them to repeatedly say to themselves, “God is with me!” Their message in all they do, the bishop said, is the message of God’s love. “There is no limit to the love of God manifest in Jesus Christ,” she declared. 

After being commissioned to “take the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ into all the world,” the missionaries offered in unison the historic covenant prayer that begins, addressed to God, “I am no longer my own, but thine.” Each received an anchor cross, the traditional sign of United Methodist missionary service.

The Global Mission Fellows program in all its facets takes young adults such as these out of their home environments and places them in new contexts, where they become part of new local communities. One objective is to connect the church in mission across cultural and geographical boundaries. Another is to encourage the young people to grow spiritually and socially, becoming strong leaders committed to building justice communities and a peaceful world. 

The new US 2 Global Mission Fellows are, alphabetically, by home annual conference and placement:

• Kimberly Bishop, Virginia, to: Nome Community Center, Alaska

 

Gregory Bishop, Virginia, to Nome Community Center, Alaska

 

Jamie Booth, Kentucky, to St. Francis in the Foothills UMC, Tucson, Arizona

 

Amber Feezor, Arkansas, to General Board of Church & Society, Washington, DC

 

Kayla Flannery, Desert Southwest, to Detroit Annual Conference

 

Sarah Hundley, Virginia, to Oklahoma Annual Conference

Andrew Kastner, Missouri, to Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference

Caitlin Kastner, Missouri, to Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference

Emily Kvalheim, West Ohio, to Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference

Catherine Shaw, East Ohio, to Francis in the Foothills UMC, Tucson, Arizona

Nicholas Stanford, West Michigan, Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference

Victoria Stanford, West Michigan, to Young Adult Missional Movement of the Florida Annual Conference

Rachel Ternes, Rocky Mountain, to Central District Eastern Pennsylvania Annual Conference

 

Christina Trager, Peninsula-Delaware, to Virginia Annual Conference

 

Chelsea Williams, North Carolina, to Detroit Annual Conference.

 

Elliott Wright is an information consultant working with the General Board of Global Ministries.

- See more at: http://www.umcmission.org/learn-about-us/news-and-stories/2015/july/fifteen-new-young-adult-missionaries-to-serve-in-united-states#sthash.ar9EAOVC.dpuf